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PIO6

Water Resources

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General water information

• Population: 100,702
• Water connections: 34,540
• Water demand by customer category: 
    Residential - 67% 
    Commercial - 13%
    Industrial - 8% 
    Institutional - 10%
    Wholesale - 2%

Water demand

Annual daily average: 12 million gallons
Summer peak: 22 million gallons per day
Winter daily average: 10 million gallons per day
Average annual usage: 13,441 acre-feet. An acre-foot equals 325,851 gallons. 

Water supplies 

Current water supplies are surface water (reservoirs and lakes) and the required minimum daily groundwater production from the Hickory Aquifer (approximately 1.5 million gallons per day).

Primary sources

O.H. Ivie Reservoir
• Owned and operated by the Colorado River Municipal Water District
• Purpose: Water supply
• Supplies: Odessa, Big Spring, Snyder, Midland, Abilene, San Angelo, Ballinger and Millersview-Doole
• Storage capacity: 554,339 acre-feet. An acre-foot equals 325,851 gallons.
• Capacity filled: 21% as of October 1
 
Twin Buttes Reservoir
• Owned by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. Managed under contract by the City of San Angelo.    
• Purpose: Water supply, irrigation and flood control
• Supplies: City of San Angelo, Tom Green County and Water Control Improvement District No. 1
• Storage capacity: 186,244 acre-feet. An acre-foot equals 325,851 gallons.
• Capacity filled: 14% as of October 1
 
Lake Nasworthy
• Owned and operated by the City of San Angelo
• Purpose: Water supply
• Supplies: City of San Angelo
• Storage capacity: 12,500 acre-feet. An acre-foot equals 325,851 gallons.
• Capacity filled: 84% as of October 1

O.C. Fisher Reservoir
• Owned and operated by the Upper Colorado River Authority
• Purpose: Water supply and flood control
• Supplies: City of San Angelo and UCRA
• Storage capacity: 119,000 acre-feet. An acre-foot equals 325,851 gallons.
• Capacity filled: 9% as of October 1
 
Lake Spence 
• Owned and operated by the Colorado River Municipal Water District
• Purpose: Water supply
• Supplies: Odessa, Big Spring, Snyder, Midland and San Angelo
• Storage Capacity: 488,000 acre-feet. An acre-foot equals 325,851 gallons.
• Capacity filled: 14% as of October 1

New water supplies 

Hickory Aquifer: 35,000 acres of groundwater rights acquired in 1971 and 1972. 62 miles southeast of San Angelo in McCullough County near Brady. The Hickory Aquifer project currently has the ability to pump 10.8 million gallons per day to San Angelo and has the equipment in place to treat a total of 8 million gallons per day. The City is exploring full development of the Hickory to produce up to 12 million gallons per day.

The City of San Angelo is also engaged in the West Texas Water Partnership, a collaborative effort with the cities of Abilene and Midland to jointly find and develop water sources that could serve all three communities and the rest of the region.

Drought levels

Stages are based on available supply from all surface water sources:
• Standard conservation: more than 2 years supply
• Drought Level 1: less than 2 years supply
• Drought Level 2: 18 months or less
• Drought Level 3: 12 months or less

With approximately 32 months of supply as of October 1, San Angelo is currently in standard conservation. Outside watering is allowed twice every seven days at no more than 1 inch per week and not between the hours of noon to 6 p.m. It is always a violation to allow water to run more than 150 feet off one's property down any street, gutter, alley or ditch.

Report watering violations by clicking on this link or calling 325-277-8906. For more information, go to cosatx.us/water. Do your part; be water smart!